SEO learning tips:

For as long as I can remember, the best way for me to learn has been to do. I have gone through countless checklists while trying to understand search engine optimization. The following is a compilation of the most useful checklists I have completed in order to learn SEO. My intent is that this list can be used by people who are inexperienced in SEO but want to learn more. (As a bonus I included handy dandy check boxes.)

seo google internet marketing

seo google internet marketing

The Beginner’s Checklist to Learning SEO

Learn how to build a basic website

Before diving into SEO techniques it is important to know the basics of web development. The following tasks will develop the necessary web development skills needed to become a successful SEO:

Learn how to code a basic website without using a WYSIWYG editor – Don’t fear the word code, writing HTML is much easier than you think. If you can make a sandwich with two pieces of bread and put something in the middle, you can write HTML. For help, check out this excellent tutorial. Remember, don’t worry about SEO techniques at this point. Focus on learning how to build a website first.

Code a website that contains the following:

o All styles with CSS. No Tables!
o Homepage has 3 unique paragraphs about you
o 3 pages total; homepage, contact and portfolio

Update: As of July 11th 2009, I have upgraded my website’s layout so it may no longer be as useful as a sample as it was prior to the upgrade.

I have created a sample for you using my information, Danny Dover. Feel free to use it as a guide but don’t copy and paste my code or you won’t learn anything. You will likely have to scour the internet to learn how to fill some of these requirements. This is useful because it improves your searching skills. (Note: I have purposefully not SEOed my example website. You will see why in a little bit)

CheckboxPick Your Keywords – Pick keywords that are uncompetitive. This is very important as the words you choose will become the center of your SEO efforts. I recommend using your name. Go to Google and search for yourself. If a small amount of low quality websites show up, use your name as your keywords. If your name is competitive to rank for, find a variation of your name that is easier. Ex. Danny Ben Dover.

Register a domain name and find hosting – This is not nearly as difficult as it sounds. I recommend SiteGround as good option. However, there are literally thousands of choices. Use your best judgment, but remember you shouldn’t be paying more than $7.00 USD a month and the domain name should be included for free. Your only requirement is that your host can’t have immovable ads. These could be crawled by the search engines and ruin your rankings. For your domain name, use your keywords from above. Ex. dannydover.com or dannybendover.com. If your keywords are not available as a domain name, choose different keywords. (Note: In this exercise, the keywords you are optimizing for and your domain name should be the same. Although this is not always the case in the real world, having similar keywords to your domain name makes SEO much easier.)

Upload your website files to your new hosting account – The easiest method is to use FTP to drag and drop your files. See your hosting provider for details.

Sign up for Google Analytics and verify your website – This free tool will allow you to track visitors to your website. Installation instructions are included by Google.

Wait a week and search for your keywords in the big four search engines – I generally use the rank checker tool as a shortcut. It is alright if your website doesn’t show up. That is what SEO is for. If you do find your website ranking (even if it is not on the first page), record how it ranks in the major search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing) in a spreadsheet.

Wait two weeks to allow search engines to find your site and for Google Analytics to gather data.

Learn about SEO and apply it to your website

Now for the fun part. Learn basic SEO techniques and apply them to your glorious website. This will allow you to see how SEO can help your website rank.

Read the entire Beginner’s Guide to SEO – This is essential to building a strong SEO foundation. I also recommend reading the completed parts of the new Beginner’s Guide and Aaron Wall’s SEO Overview.

Read all of the Google Search Engine Ranking Factors – These will reinforce what you already know and give a perspective on variation. These factors are based off of the experience of some of the SEO industry’s most successful people.

Sign up for Google Webmaster Tools, verify and read everything – This phenomenal resource will show you how Googlebot sees your website and point out any SEO problems you have on your site. Be sure to familiarize yourself with it. The information it provides is formulated toward Google but applies to all the search engines.

Run your website through the SEOmoz tools – Specifically, I recommend the Term Target Tool and Page Strength Tool. These tools will point out areas where you can improve your website.

Add a robots.txt file and a sitemap – Although these are not really necessary for such a small site, familiarizing yourself with these files will be indispensable.

Apply your knowledge – Optimize your Title Tags, URLs, Anchor Text, HTML structure (H1, H2), and keyword usage. This is the bread and butter of onsite search engine optimization.

Link build – Add a link to your website on all of your favorite social media/networking sites. Feel free to try your luck with linkbait, although for a site with no competition this isn’t really necessary.

Track your site on Linkscape and Yahoo! Site Explorer – Wait a month for Linkscape and Yahoo to find your links and then check to see what links are being counted. On Yahoo, be sure to select “inlinks except from this domain to entire site.” Only the links on Linkscape are displayed in the order of importance.

Check Google Analytics – By this time, you should see more interesting data from your analytics tool. Use this data to learn the basics of analytics and use it as a reference point while link building.

Update your spreadsheet – Search for your keywords in the big three search engines again and look to see where your website ranks. Record these results in your spreadsheet. Tracking your data lets you see what techniques are working what techniques are not worth your time.

Test your own SEO theories and record the results – This is not really a task you can ever complete. 90% of all SEO information is already freely available if you can find it. Testing your own theories and getting good results will help you uncover the remaining 10% necessary to out perform your competition.

I sincerely believe that if you complete all the tasks on this list you will be well on your way to becoming a successful SEO. I recommend printing this post out and pasting it somewhere visible near your computer. That way you can complete all of the tasks in your spare time and develop your skills. Best of luck to all of the new SEOs.

Source: http://www.seomoz.org/
pic: http://www.flashdaweb.com

spam seo no follow nofollow

spam seo no follow nofollow

Discourage spammers by putting NoFollow attribute on links. Good reading. Good info on SEO

January 18, 2005

In the first cooperative move for nearly ten years, the major search engines have unveiled a new indexing command for web authors that they all recognize, one that they hope will help reduce the link and comment spam that plagues many web sites, especially those run by bloggers.

The new “nofollow” attribute that can be associated with links was originated as an idea by Google several weeks ago and pitched past MSN and Yahoo, as well as major blogging vendors, gaining support.

The Nofollow Attribute

The new attribute is called “nofollow” with rel=”nofollow” being the format inserted within an anchor tag. When added to any link, it will serve as a flag that the link has not been explicitly approved by the site owner.

For example, this is how the HTML markup for an ordinary link might look:

Visit My Page

This is how the link would look after the nofollow attribute has been added, with the attribute portion shown in bold

Visit My Page

This would also be acceptable, as order of elements within the anchor tag makes no difference:

Visit My Page

Once added, the search engines supporting the attribute will understand that the link has not been vetted in some way by the site owner. Think of it as a way to flag to them, “I didn’t post this link — someone else did.”

By the way, should you be one of the few using other types of rel attributes within your links (a way to show the relationship between your page and the page you’re linking to), Google advises that you should separate them with spaces.

For example, Google cited this page, which provides one example of multiple rel attributes in action, like this:

Jane

If you wanted to add nofollow to the existing one, you’d just put a space between it and the other attributes of sweetheart, date and met, like this:

Jane

Google also said upper or lower case is usage of the attribute is fine and that the creation of this new attribute is believed to meet W3C standards on markup, as they allow for anyone to create new attributes.

Causes Of Link Spam

Why would you want to use the attribute? Blog publishers, forum operators, sites with guest books and others who allow anyone to contribute in some way to their web sites have suffered when people have used these systems to spam them with links.

For search engine purposes, getting a link to your site from someone else’s site can serve as a “vote” that your site is seen as good. In Googlespeak, getting a link increases the PageRank value of your page — sometimes a tiny bit, sometimes much more.

In addition, getting a link may help better ensure that your page is indexed by the major search engines. Finally, getting a link with words you want to be found for embedded in the anchor text can help you not just be seen as popular but also help you rank better for particular words.

Here’s an example of comment spam in action. I did a Google search for texas holdem comment to find some candidates and focused on this page as an illustration. From PoliPundit.com, it’s a blog post from Nov. 2002 about a political development.

Below the post is the comment area. The area has been link spammed heavily — 30 entries containing links to web sites promoting casinos, poker, dating and other topics, like this (I’ve removed the links):

http://www.-texas-holdem-poker.us holdem poker texas holdem poker
Comment by texas holdem poker | Email | Homepage | 12/26/2004 – 12:31 pm

Your blogg is smashing! Payday Loans http://www.payday-express.com
Comment by Payday Loans | Email | Homepage | 1/15/2005 – 4:04 am

Your blogg is full o information. HGH http://www.hgh-express.com
Comment by HGH | Email | Homepage | 1/15/2005 – 12:40 pm

Great article and great website. I wish you could update if more frequently.
You?re also welcome to visit my websites: Checks, Cigarette, Dating, Honda,
Insurance, Las Vegas, Lawyers, Lexus, Online Poker, PDA, Toyota.

It’s not just a Google problem. Do a Yahoo search, an Ask Jeeves search, or a search at MSN Search. All bring up examples of pages that contain link spam, which have been indexed by these search engines. As a result, they also might find their ranking systems impacted by the activity.

Google, nevertheless, often gets the blame — which is why it was under the most pressure for coming up with something for the problem. The hope is that by allowing web authors to flag links in this manner, it will make blogs, forums, guest books and other places accepting contributions less attractive to spamming.

What Nofollow Means

Below I’ll cover what Google says it does, if it sees a link with the nofollow attributed associated with it. Yahoo and MSN are likely to react in a similar fashion, though I haven’t yet spoken with them to get exact details since news of their support only just emerged.

If Google sees nofollow as part of a link, it will:

1. NOT follow through to that page.
2. NOT count the link in calculating PageRank link popularity scores.
3. NOT count the anchor text in determining what terms the page being linked to is relevant for.

That’s the situation at the moment. Google is going to evaluate how the attribute works, and it could decide to make other changes down the line, it says.

Now let’s look at the impact of each action:

1) Not following the link to the page it points at means that potentially, Google might not index the page at all. As said, the more links that point at a particular page, the more likely it is that Google (and generally the other major search engines) will include that page within its index.

The nofollow attribute DOES NOT mean that someone will prevent a page they do not actually control from being indexed, however. If Google finds even one ordinary link pointing at a page, it may then index that page.

In addition, people can submit their pages directly to Google (and most major search engines). So it’s crucial to understand that just because someone might place nofollow in a link pointing at your site, this WILL NOT prevent your page from getting indexed.

2) As for PageRank calculations, it’s important to remember that PageRank is a pure popularity score (other search engines have similar scoring mechanisms, just not catchy names other than Yahoo’s Web Rank). The nofollow attribute means that a link will not be counted as a “vote” in this popularity contest. That can have an impact on ranking, in cases where the impact of other factors beyond pure popularity come into play.

Huh? Say there are two pages, one with a PR score of 6, the other a PR of 7. Even though the PR7 page is more popular from a link counting point of view, it could still get outranked by the PR6 page if other factors such as the words on the page, or the anchor text pointing at the PR6 page, make it more relevant for a particular search.

It’s also important to note that nofollow DOES NOT mean you are flagging a link as being bad in some way. Google isn’t going to say, “Aha — nofollow is on this link — that’s a bad link.” Or as Matt Cutts, a Google software engineer who helped develop the attribute, said:

“It doesn’t mean that it is a bad link, or that you that you hate it, just that this link doesn’t belong to me.”

Instead, nofollow effectively will cause Google to ignore the link, to pretend it doesn’t exist. This also means you shouldn’t worry that people will link to you and use nofollow as a way to hurt you — Google says that won’t happen.

3) This leads to anchor text. Generally much more important in ranking well for a particular term is to get the words you want to rank well for put into a link that points at you. With nofollow added to a link, Google won’t associate the anchor text in the link with the page the link is pointed at. This, more than anything else, will sour things for link spammers.

Stop Spam? No. A Start, Yes!

The new attribute won’t stop link spamming. Many people may still spam simply because they hope human beings will see the links, click through and perhaps convert. As with email spam, maybe only an incredibly tiny number will do so. But since there’s no heavy cost to the spamming, that might still be enough.

In particular, much blog spamming is done through automation. So even with the new system in place, some of that automation will keep rolling along. It will no doubt even evolve to spot blogs and other areas that aren’t making use of the nofollow attributes, just as smart spammers currently focus on blogs that have been abandoned, rather than irritating active bloggers.

This means other types of systems of blocking spam will likely still have to be used, such as forcing people to input characters from graphics (captchas), registration and so on (The Solution To Blog Spamming at ThreadWatch has a nice rundown on these, and also see Six Apart’s Guide to Comment Spam).

While link or comment spamming isn’t going away, it’s still heartening that it will be less attractive. Site owners have been given an important new tool that lets them control indexing — something they’ve not had offered for years. Perfect or not, I’m glad it’s emerged.

Vendor Support

Google started developing the idea of a nofollow attribute several weeks ago and quietly shared it with a number of the major blogging vendors. Many of them have now signed on, pledging to support and implement the tag in the future, if they’ve not already done so now.

As a result, those using systems provided by one of the major vendors such as Blogger or Movable Type (see here for support news) should find that implementing the tags to be associated in links in comments is a matter of flipping a switch. OK, maybe clicking a radio button or drop-down box! Google provides a list of those supporting it here.

Google said it will soon begin talking with other companies, such as those that making forum software. But makers of these packages or any packages could implement support when they are ready.

Uses For The Attribute

The tag can be used by anyone anywhere, of course. It’s not just for use with blog comment areas or forum posts. For example, Cutts said people might use it if they publish dynamically generated referrer stats and visitor information.

“Wherever it means that another person placed a link on your site, that would be appropriate,” Cutts said.

Because of this, some page authoring tools will likely add support in the future, if it is widely adopted as will likely be the case. Some tools may allow adding it right now — and those who know HTML code can do an easy insertion.

That might be handy if you need to link to a site but are worried that a search engine might consider it a “bad neighborhood,” as they’ve often described them. In reality, the chances are very small that the typical person might link to a site that would actually hurt them with a search engine. But if in double, nofollow could offer peace of mind.

Of course, those who are swapping links with other sites now have a whole new thing to look out for. If someone offers to link to you, you’ll want to make sure they don’t make use of the nofollow tag — at least if you were hoping for some search engine gain. Otherwise, the link’s not going to count.

Don’t forget — there are other good reasons to still get links even beyond search engines, of course. My Golden Rules Of Link Building article covers this more.

You definitely DO NOT want to use the attribute on links to your own pages. Do that, and you’ll deprive your own pages from the chance of influencing how your other pages rank.

Having said this, I’ve no doubt some people will try playing with the new tag as a means to “hoard” PageRank that’s passed on to only a few pages in your site. For example, your home page might link to 25 of your internal pages. Using the new attribute, you could exclude all but five of these pages. Do that, and you might possibly cause Google to give those five pages more credit (see the Link Building & Link Analysis article for Search Engine Watch members for more about this).

Maybe. Perhaps. And perhaps the search engines may make other changes down the line. Rather than get tricky with this tag, I’d recommend using it as intended for now — as a means to flag that there are certain links on your web site that you didn’t place there.

Support From Other Search Engines

How about the other search engines? MSN and Yahoo are onboard. In fact, Yahoo beat Google out of the gate in blogging its support of the new tag first. A Defense Against Comment Spam offers a few details, an example and news that the change will be implemented in the coming weeks.

As for MSN, Working Together Against Blog Spam explains how the company made a snap decision today to support the tag, though the idea was something it had considered during its Search Champs meetings with bloggers and search marketers several months ago. It promises that its crawler will begin respecting the attribute in the coming weeks.

Google, of course, has been onboard from the start. It provides more details on its blog in Preventing comment spam.

So how about Ask Jeeves, the remaining major crawler? They’re still looking at the new option and weighing it up.

“We’ll consider it for the future, but because we use local [link] popularity and not global popularity, we are not going to rush into anything today. It has more impact for Google and Yahoo because of their similar methodologies. The upside for us is much more modest,” Lanzone said.

By local popularity, Ask Jeeves is referring to how its Teoma search engine will calculate the popularity of pages and do ranking only after culling a subset of pages deemed relevant, rather than looking at all links from across the entire web. My Make Room For Teoma article explains this more.

More Info

Google To Add “Nofollow” Tagging Of Links To Fight Spam? is where I explain more about how the news of the new attribute emerged, plus provides some background on the difference between it and the nofollow attribute of the meta robots tag.

Comment Spam? How About An Ignore Tag? How About An Indexing Summit! is my post wishing for an “ignore” tag similar to what’s emerged here and how others have been wishing for this even longer.

It also looks at how it has been literally years since we’ve had an advancement in the type of indexing control given to site owners. This new attribute — whether you love the idea or hate it — is welcome move for at least giving site owners themselves some choice in the matter.

The New Nofollow Link Attribute is a thread in our forums where you can discuss the new attribute.

Source: blog.searchenginewatch.com
Source of image: 2.bp.blogspot.com

SEO alias Search Engine Optimization atau dengan kata lain seberapa terkenalnya website kita dalam pandangan daftar pencarian Google menuai banyak manfaat. Ini karena fakta akan kesadaran berinternet pada masyarakat dunia kian hari kian meningkat. Kiat2 penguasaan SEO akan dijelaskan sebagai berikut:

2 Tips Memenangkan Kontes SEO

Kunci keberhasilan dalam SEO sebenarnya hanya ada 2 versi Google, Content dan Backlink.

Content

Content (konten atau isi) adalah faktor terbesar anda memenangkan sebuah kontes SEO. Kualitas isi disini maksudnya adalah informasi yang terkandung dalam tulisan anda. Beberapa tips memaksimalkan konten:

  • Gunakan bahasa yang baik dan benar. Jika anda menggunakaan Bahasa Indonesia maka perhatikanlah ejaan yang disempurnakan.
  • Panjang artikel jangan terlalu pendek dan jangan terlalu panjang. Jika terlalu pendek anda tidak bisa memaksimalkan informasi yang akan disampaikan dan jika terlalu panjang maka anda akan membuat pembaca ketakutan.
  • Format tulisan yang mudah dibaca dan diserap ilmunya oleh pembaca.
  • Selebihnya ini akan tergantung dari anda, bagaimana menciptakan tulisan yang mengundang komentar, bagaimana tulisan yang dapat mempengaruhi pembaca, pada intinya buatlah tulisan semenarik mungkin.
  • Gunakan gambar sebagai penarik perhatian pembaca. Selain itu gambar juga bisa menaikkan penilaian, beri nama dan deskripsi yang berkaitan dengan kata kunci. Jika gambar berasal dari website lain jangan lupa menyertakan sumbernya karena kadang gambar itu mengandung hak cipta.
  • Rajinlah menulis, karena anda pembaca akan menghargai blog anda “lebih” demikian juga search engine.
    Sebisa mungkin anda fokus terhadap 1 topik pembahasan

Backlink

Backlink adalah link-link dari website/blog lain yang menaut ke tulisan anda. Maksudnya ketika ada orang lain yang menulis artikel sejenis dan menjadikan tulisan pada blog anda sebagai rujukan/referensi. Jika anda belum mampu membuat orang lain menghargai tulisan anda maka anda bisa memanfaatkan beberapa situs-situs bookmarking atau melalui blog-blog anda yang lainnya.

Beberapa tips mendapatkan backlink yang berkualitas adalah ketika anda menjadikan blog sendiri (dummy blog) sebagai sumber backlink maka:

  • Tulisan merupakan tulisan yang memang benar-benar relevan, sama tag dan sama kategori.
  • Tulisan sebisa mungkin berbeda judul denga tulisan utama
  • Tulisan sebisa mungkin berbeda isi (jangan copy paste)

Sumber: mumtanaz.dagdigdug.com
Sumber Gambar: copyblogger.com